Tag Archives: Flu

Cabbage & Ginger and the Flu…Oh My!

I know, I know. I promised I would be posting daily, especially since I’m in the process of making sauerkraut, and the cabbage needs to be checked on daily. But, the upper respiratory crud that is making the circuits managed to run me down and I was in bed yesterday. Definitely was not part of the agenda! I did check on the cabbage, but unfortunately, didn’t get pictures. Oops! Suffice to say, I had to add a couple of cups of brine. It did sweat and produce it’s own juice, but not enough to submerge the cabbage. So I added 1 teaspoon of Himalayan Pink Salt to 2 cups of filtered water (1/2 teaspoon of sea salt per cup of water for brine) and added that to the cabbage, then pressed down a few times to allow air bubbles to escape and make sure the cabbage gets submerged so it can ferment and not get mold.

Here is update for Day 2 (today):  No extra brine needed today! But it, of course, for this time of year, is far from being sauerkraut! Still looks and smells like cabbage.

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As I said, the upper respiratory crud going around managed to grab hold of me yesterday. Nothing like feeling like you’ve just stepped off a Merry-Go-Round all day! Was queasy with absolutely NO appetite and felt like a stone sitting on my chest and a sore throat and itchy ears to boot. So, I did what the annual publication of Herbal Remedies suggested and had 2 good size mugs of Cinnamon Ginger Tea instead of my usual 1 at lunch. There really is something to these homemade remedies! I had already been drinking it occasionally, but I have become more diligent as of late!

Ginger Tea

Place about an inch (depending on size of ginger rhizome) of ginger, thinly sliced, into a pot of 1 ¾ cups of boiling water. Add ½ – 1 teaspoon of organic ground cinnamon (or you can use a fresh cinnamon stick), cover, turn temperature to low and let simmer for 10-15 minutes (the longer it steeps, the more zing there will be to your tea). Remove from stove, strain into a mug and add 1 tablespoon of raw honey. Can drink hot or cover and let cool to drink later.  *For warmth, better digestion, nausea/morning sickness and to lessen congestion.

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I had to grab something to use that would hold a good 2 cups the last several days as another member of the household has been VERY sick with this upper respiratory mess, she wound up having to go to the doctor yesterday. I handed her the Herbal Remedies magazine to read and she asked about the Ginger Tea that I drink and could I make her some? She drinks hers fresh and very hot! But she said that it is not only good, but soothes her throat (one of a number of benefits). Because of the spice that is ginger, it stings a little as you’re drinking it (like soda does, only soda is NOT something anyone needs to be drinking), but then you get this numbing and soothing sensation. The honey helps with the coughing. It is recommended to drink 2 to 3 cups a day when you’re sick, and after yesterday, I see why. I do feel better today, but I have a cough and congestion.

Which leads me to something else I plan on trying a bit later today:  Ginger Bath. It has been a few years since I actually sat and soaked in a bathtub due to having a hard time getting down and back up thanks to my crappy back! But when you’re sick with this stuff, you are willing to try anything, and everything I’ve read says this Ginger Bath (and Ginger Footbath) really work.

Via Pure Inside Out, as well as numerous other sources both online and off, here are benefits of Ginger:

Main Health-Enhancing Benefits of Ginger

  • Calms nausea, including motion sickness dizziness
  • Relieves gas and bloating
  • Helps stop diarrhea
  • Boosts digestion
  • Calms menstrual cramps
  • Relieves headaches
  • Anti-inflamatory
  • Stabilises blood pressure (equally when too high or too low)
  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Soothes cold and flu symptoms, as well as respiratory infections
  • Known for its anti-cancer properties
  • Freshens the breath naturally

The anti-inflammatory properties of ginger have been known and valued for centuries. Modern Medicine has now provided scientific support for the long-held belief that ginger contains constituents with anti-inflammatory properties. It is known to reduce the pain of rheumatoid arthritis and encourage blood circulation.

Caution: If you take anti-coagulants, consult your doctor before using ginger.

 

Ginger Bath: You can use either fresh grated ginger or ginger powder. Add ½ a cup of freshly grated ginger or a rounded teaspoon of ginger powder in hot or warm water and soak for 15-20 minutes. Please remember that the ginger bath will make you sweat profusely for at least an hour afterwards, so wear a bathrobe or sweat clothes.

Make sure you drink plenty of water after the bath. If you have sensitive skin or are allergy-prone, test ginger on your skin for irritation before the bath.

 

I’ll let you know how I feel tomorrow. But as of now, it looks promising!